For every business that aims to take off properly and become exceedingly productive, a well-crafted, goal-oriented mission statement should not be considered an after thought and your wellness business is not an exception.

This is a guest post by Grace Daniel. Grace is a conversion copywriter. She specializes in helping health coaches and wellness business owners craft compelling email and website copies that drives sales. She also assists wellness business owners to stand out online by helping then structure a brand voice and personality that attracts their target audience.


In this blog post, I’ll explain in detail why you need a mission statement, what makes a good mission statement and how to come up with one for wellness business.

Do you need a mission statement in your wellness business? And why?

The simple answer is (and has always been), Yes. You need a mission statement in your business even if you are just in the process of conceiving the dream for the reason that a mission statement acts a guiding light to propel you towards your goal.

It serves as the heart of your business and articulates your values and purpose to everyone you come in contact with including your prospective client and the people who would one day be part of your team forming a strong culture and work ethics among your people.

Finally, and maybe most importantly, it direct the everyday activities of your business, your strategic decisions, and keep you and your entire team motivated.

What is the difference between a vision and a mission statement

In one sentence, your mission statement embodies what you are trying to achieve for your client, it is very much in the present, while your vision statement is futuristic and elucidates what you want the world your business creates to look like.

What makes a good mission statement

To be able to stand head and shoulder above the rest and can cut through the noise in the wellness industry, a good mission statement must be:

  • Simple and straightforward: 

A good and compelling mission statement should be a able to convey the core idea in a few simple words.

An example is from John F. Kennedy's famous 1961 speech to "put a man on the moon and return him safely by the end of the decade." Everything there is to say in a few compact words.

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  • Aligned with your values: 

A well crafted mission statement expresses with clarity the values upon which your business exists. 

An example is from Southwest Airlines’ “We are THE low-fare airline”. This states without a blur, what the owners of southwest airlines believe to be most important. That their customers enjoy flying to their destination at the lowest cost possible.

  • Evokes emotions

Your wellness mission statement should evoke the emotions of your audience at first contact because people buy with emotion and will rally around a brand which they feel is aligned with their feelings and sense of self. A mission that evokes emotion also creates inspiration and motivation amongst your team by making them feel part of something bigger.

An example is the one from Pepsi “Create more smiles with every sip and every bite”. With this, their employees are not just making and bottling cola, they are creating smiles. 

A similar one is from their leading competitor Coca cola “To refresh the world in mind, body, and spirit, to inspire moments of optimism and happiness through our brands and actions, and to create value and make a difference.”

How to craft a compelling mission statement

Now it is time to get a pen and note pad because I am going to walk you through discovering your mission statement by talking your through a simple and short exercise.

  • Get clear on your “WHYs”

I’m seriously avoiding the word purpose here because as a business owner and even as a person your purpose is not the actualization of one thing and it evolves as you conceive new businesses and ideas.

Instead, I say get clear on your whys. Why are you in business? Putting aside the desire to create wealth which is an utmost goal for everyone in business, why else would you do this? Why a wellness business of all the options?

  • Clarify who you want to serve: 

If you were to work with one person everyday for the rest of your life, who would it be? What transformation would you want to bring this person? How would you want them to feel after working with you?

All these questions points to identifying who your ideal client is. Their needs, their challenges are, and what motivates them.

  • Identify your values

Identify your values will help you figure out what your business stand for and the image or level of integrity you want to portray. What are your non negotiables and the culture that would be formed into your business’s community?

  • What is the status quo you want to defy

What is that one thing in your industry that you wish somebody or everybody did something about? What gets you angry when you see it? What change do you want to see in the world? What motivates you and gets you out of bed to your work desk every morning?

  • Put everything together into a clear and actionable statement: 

Now is the time to fix the fragment into one whole. Simply adhere to the characteristics of a good mission statement written above and gradually piece the puzzle. 

It is important to realize that you might not get a really compelling statement on the first try but you’d be able to figure it out after the first few tries.

In conclusion,

Your mission statement is primary to the effective running of your business and hopefully after reading this and going through this exercise, you already have a broad picture of what your mission statement should like. With a few tries, you should be able to define it concisely. After which you should insert it everywhere including your website, social media, client and employee onboarding documents etc.

About the Author

Grace is a conversion copywriter. She specializes in helping health coaches and wellness business owners craft compelling email and website copies that drives sales. She also assists wellness business owners to stand out online by helping then structure a brand voice and personality that attracts their target audience.
You can reach Grace at grace@grace-daniel.com


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